October 13th, 2016

2016october13_android_bIn 2014, less than 10 percent of American consumers listed cash as their preferred payment type. Most of us live and breathe by those slim plastic cards, so it was only a matter of time until they were merged with our other plastic lifelines -- smartphones. What may come as a surprise to some however, is that ditching credit cards for digital wallets is already an option, and a safe one at that. Take a look at our summary of Android Pay for everything you need to get started.

Google introduced Android pay in September of 2015 as a successor to its simpler, less functional Google Wallet. And for the majority of its lifespan, Android Pay has been available only in the US, but as of July this year it’s also available in the UK, Singapore, and Australia. With the addition of those three countries came hundreds of supported financial institutions, totaling nearly 400 in all.

So, we know the who and the where...but what exactly is Android Pay? One of its functions is to safely store credit card, debit card, membership card, and gift card information until you need those details to complete a financial transaction. After installing and opening the app, you’ll see credit cards that are already associated with your Google account, and an option to add new cards -- which is as simple as taking a picture of it.

Obviously, we wouldn’t write an entire blog on a service that just stores this information, so you’ve probably guessed that you can also make payments from your phone as well. If technology is all about making things easy, Android Pay is way ahead of the curve. To make a payment, just unlock your phone and place it near any point-of-sale device that is compatible (usually marked by an Android Pay sticker). You don’t need to open up the app; the two devices automatically exchange a one-time encrypted token to create a secure connection, and you can tap which card you’d like to use.

All your transactions are organized in the app for quick reference and tracking, including payments made online rather than via tapping your phone at physical locations. All you need to utilize this futuristic service is a smartphone with Android 4.4 or higher and near field communication (NFC) hardware. Both are common on most modern smartphones.

Details on the security protocols for Android Pay are a bit complicated for this venue, but in a nutshell your accounts are even more safe than using physical credit and debit cards. Previously, when breaches of major retailers took place, attackers had access to records detailing customer card numbers. With Android Pay, all they have access to is the randomly generated tokens that authorize the transaction -- your account numbers are never transmitted wirelessly to prevent snooping criminals from grabbing them out of thin air.

It seems like every day there is some new technology or service that feels like something from a distant future. Between work and a personal life, most of us don’t have a lot of time for adopting groundbreaking technology, be it social or business-related. But that doesn’t have to be the case. Get in touch with us today, and your Android device will never be behind the times again.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Android
September 27th, 2016

2016september27_androidtablet_bIn a bombshell announcement for the non-Apple gadget geeks, reports are surfacing that Google plans to team up with Huawei to build its next Nexus Android tablet. Up until last year, Huawei’s relationship with Google has been limited to manufacturing the Google Nexus 6P phone. But with these new reports, the industry is abuzz with the possibility of a refresh of one of Android’s best tablets. Let’s take a closer look. People spend a lot of time looking for and comparing the best tablets on the market. Obviously, some prefer the iPad Pro 12.9 for its gigantic screen, but for those who just can't get enough of the customizations available for Android devices, a Google Nexus Android tablet is best.

But whether Google retains the ‘Nexus’ name remains to be seen. On October 4, the tech giant will host an event to release devices in their new ‘Pixel’ line and may add a Huawei tablet to this family. With its rumored 4GB of RAM and top-of-the-line specifications, the new device from Google and Huawei will enable users to enjoy an experience on par with that of a full-fledged desktop computer -- all while stripping the out-of-the-box model of any unnecessary manufacturer software and bloatware.

In 2015, Huawei manufactured Google’s Nexus 6P smartphone, which was lauded as "the most premium Nexus ever." That fact, combined with Huawei’s existing tablet prowess from its experiences with the MediaPad M3, make this an all-star team-up.

Although we only know a handful of specifics about this new tablet, we do know that we love the Huawei/Google smartphone collaboration and can expect good things. Being a leader in the industry means constantly keeping your ear to the ground for new and exciting releases. You can trust us to always be one step ahead of the competition with our insider knowledge. For all your Android and mobile device questions, we’re the authority. Get in touch with us today.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Android
September 9th, 2016

2016September9_AndroidPhone_BWhen an archaeologist discovers relics of a long-forgotten dynasty, mixed emotions ensue. The thrill of stumbling upon something untouched intertwines with a slight dread of working with something you know nothing about. The same notion is applicable to smartphones, in particular, operating system updates. Android’s latest update, Nougat, for example, has also evoked a mix of emotions, from excitement to suspicion. Cast doubts aside by looking through the top 9 features from Android Nougat.

Split-screen multitasking

With the new split-screen multitasking view, users are able to use two apps simultaneously. Hit the overview button and select the app you want to use to the top of the screen, then the second one beneath it. Windows are resizable as well.

Out with the old and in with the new (emojis)

The update comes with an additional 72 new emojis to the roster, with brand new characters such as the selfie, bacon, and even an avocado emoji as well. On top of skin tone variations, 14 new emojis are added to the “animals and nature” category and 12 to the “activities” category.

Customizable quick settings

Quick settings, aka the school of shortcuts, are now fully customizable. This means you can rearrange them or even add new ones as you see fit.

Notification reply

The latest update allows you to reply to notifications without the hassle of switching apps -- totally ideal for quick replies to emails and texts.

Quick Switch

This new multitasking feature allows you to quickly shift between your two most recently used applications. Simply double tap the overview button to toggle between the two.

Split-screen gesture shortcut

Ideal for power users, the split-screen gesture shortcut generally requires a few steps for activation. There is a hidden setting that allows you to do the same with just one gesture. Start by enabling the “Systems UI Tuner” by tapping the settings icon from the notifications shade. Wait for a vibration and then let go to activate it.

From there, go to Settings > System UI Turner > Other > Enable split-screen swipe-up gesture and turn the setting on. From there, you can switch to split-screen from any app by simply swiping over the overview button.

Advanced notification controls

Enable the setting for “Power notification controls” by going to System UI Turner > Other > Power Notification Controls. This allows you to prioritize settings by the application as well as designate the actions a notification can take.

Data Saver

The Data Saver mode reduces the amount of data your applications use in the background.

Call blocking

Numbers that you’ve blocked from texting and calling are now shared with other applications, ensuring that the same numbers will remain blocked across all applications.

Much like when you move residences, the intricacies of a newly updated operating system require patience and a willingness to learn new things. After a while, you get used to the system and the novelty wears off quicker than you can say ‘Nougat.’ If you have any questions concerning the aforementioned updates, do not hesitate to get in touch with us. We’ll get you the answers in no time.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Android
August 24th, 2016

2016August25_AndroidPhone_BIn the Trojan War, a wooden horse wheeled into the city of Troy. Once night fell, the Greek army crept out of the hollow stallion and opened the city’s gates. Having breached the mighty fortress, the entire regiment eventually sealed their victory against the Trojans and won the war. The moral of the story is that pretty objects are able to conceal the most malicious of intentions. The same goes for the most secure operating systems; you should never lower your guard down even for the littlest things.

Recently, researchers from the mobile security firm Lookout confirmed that “an estimated 80 percent of Android phones contain a recently discovered vulnerability that allows attackers to terminate connections and, if the connections aren't encrypted, inject malicious code or content into the parties' communications.” The statement itself might be new, but many have already suspected a flaw in version 3.6 of Linux, dating as far back as 2012. It’s thought that the flaw itself was introduced into Android version 4.4 (aka KitKat) and is still present today, including in the latest developer preview, Android Nougat.

As numerically backed up by the Android install base and quoted by statistic provider Statista, over 1.4 billion Android devices (about 80 percent of users) are currently vulnerable. What Android users can do is to ensure that their communications are encrypted by using VPNs (virtual private networks) or by making sure that whatever sites they visit are encrypted. Encryption allows you to travel without being tracked; if the predator can’t see you, you’re no longer a target.

If you’re vulnerable, you welcome anyone with an Internet connection to determine whether or not two parties have been communicating via a long-lived transport protocol connection. This includes Webmail, news feeds as well as direct messages. Unencrypted connections allow attackers to utilize malicious code or inject content into the traffic. This doesn’t mean that encrypted connections are safe; attackers are still be able to determine and terminate the existence of channels as well. This vulnerability has been dubbed as CVE-2016-5696.

One of the more likely methods used to compromise Android users is the the insertion of JavaScript into legitimate Internet traffic that isn’t HTTPS cryptographic scheme-protected. This may display messages claiming that users have been logged out of their accounts and prompting them to re-enter their usernames and passwords. Having sent the login credentials to the attacker, similar exploits may also be used to target unpatched browsers, emails or chat apps the Android users use.

To initiate the attack, the attacker must spend about 10 seconds to establish whether two specific parties are connected, then another 45 seconds to flood their traffic with malicious content. Because it takes a certain amount of time for the attack to fully commence, these attacks aren’t suited for opportunistic attacks that affect more than one individual. Instead, this technique is ideal for the infection or surveillance of one specific target, especially if the hacker knows some of the sites the target frequently visits.

We can breathe a sigh of relief with a Google representative’s statement that company engineers are aware of the situation and are “taking appropriate actions.” He also noted that among the various vulnerabilities on Google’s patches, the Android security team has officially rated the risk as “moderate” as opposed to “high” or “critical.” Maintainers of the Linux kernel have successfully patched CVE-2016-5696. They are working toward incorporating a fix into a new Android release in the coming months.

Matters of security should never be taken lightly, especially when it comes to your personal device. For more information on this sensitive and intricate matter, please feel free to contact us anytime. We are more than happy to answer your questions. The more you know, the better.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Android
August 9th, 2016

2016August9_AndroidTablet_BLiving in today's mobile world, you want everything on the go with you: from songs to photos and videos of your most cherished moments, not forgetting all the latest apps, and all of a sudden, you run out of storage space. Before you start to get panic, try reading some of the tips below on how you can free up space on your device.

1.Buy a microSD card

The easiest fix is to buy a microSD card, if your device is compatible that is. Do keep in mind that you cannot use the extra storage for apps or system files but only for music, videos, photos, and other media files.

2.Erase apps you don’t really use

Downloading apps are like snowballs, because before you know it there are too many of them and your device just freezes over. If that’s the case, simply delete the ones you don’t need. Deleting an app doesn’t mean it’s gone forever, you can always download it again. Normally, gaming apps take up a huge chunk of storage space. You can go to Settings > Storage and tap Apps to see how much space each app uses so that you can decide which apps to get rid of, for now.

3.Clear app cache

Apps that remain on your device will still have loads of cached files, so it might be a good time to do some spring cleaning. Don’t worry since clearing app cache will not delete important files on your device. Go to Settings > Apps then go through each app to clear its cache. Or if you want to erase all the cache in bulk, you need to go to Android’s recovery mode and choose to wipe the app cache. Since each Android device is different, you’d better google to see how to enter the recovery mode for your model.

4.Make use of the cloud

Dropbox, Microsoft OneDrive, Google Drive, iCloud and more. You name it. These are services that allow you to send your media and document files to the cloud and free up space on your device. Google Photos gives you unlimited storage for both photos and videos. The only limitation is that the size of the photos must be smaller than 16 megapixels and less than 1080p for videos. It also has an option that allows you to delete files that have been sent to the cloud. In order to do so, open Google Photos app and go to Menu > Setting, then hit Free up device storage and all the backed-up files will disappear from your device.

But for privacy’s sake, note that by using these services, you’ve granted the cloud service providers access to your files. Make sure you know which photos or videos you should sent to the cloud, since the cloud is essentially other people’s (or in this case, your cloud service provider's) computers. It’s best that you keep naughty photos to yourself.

5.Stop storing and start streaming

Unless you are heading somewhere with no internet connection, there’s no need to store all your music files on your device. Spotify, Apple Music, Google Play Music, Napster, Tidal are some examples of music streaming services you can use, at a certain price of course. So if you’re a fan of freebies, Plex might be another viable option. Plex is a media server software that runs media content from a personal library and streams them on your device.

6.Add external storage

This option might be a little bit bulky and might require prettiness to give way to functionality. External storage comes in two forms: a plug-in drive similar to USB flash drive, and a wireless media hub. The first one enables you to download files from your device to your PC so you can have some more space left on the device. Or you can just stick the plug-in drive to your device and play files from it directly. Wireless media hubs like Western Digital MyPassport Wireless or Ravpower Filehub can be used to backup your files and let you access them wirelessly. Noted that you cannot play DRM-protected music or videos with this external storage--only your own media files.

Dealing with limited storage is just one of the numerous issues regarding Android devices. Compared to its iOS counterpart, Android gives users a lot more flexibility, which means there are many more functions to be explored. Why not get in touch with us today? Our experts are ready to advise you on how to boost your overall productivity.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Android
July 19th, 2016

2016July19_AndroidPhone_BCommunication is the heart of your small to medium-sized business; you write emails to customers, share documents and discuss projects with your teams over instant messaging apps, all when you’re on the move. But what if you’re trapped in an airport for hours and your colleagues need a document printed right there and then? Don’t panic. With any Android device you can remotely print the document in no time. Here are four ways to do so.

Google Cloud Print

The wonder that is Google Cloud Print allows you to send documents and files from your device to your printer without you being on the same network. To utilize this, make your printer available to Google Cloud Printing by activating it in the Chrome browser settings of the computer it’s attached to. Then, just by connecting your printer and mobile to the same Google account, you can print any document or photo by tapping the share button on your phone or tablet, and choosing Google Cloud Print.


If your SMB has any photography needs, this option might be the way to go. Prynt comes in the form of an instant photo printer that connects to your Android device’s charging port. Simply place your smartphone in the Prynt case, snap a picture, order Print, and that’s it. If you feel the need to spruce up your prints, the printer’s native app includes frames, filters, stickers and the addition of text before printing.

Manufacturer apps

Most popular printer manufacturers have their own apps that make printing from an Android device possible. HP has HP ePrint, Samsung comes with its Samsung Mobile Print, and Epson has Epson iPrint. Make sure to check the Google Play store to see if your printer has an app companion before trying any of the third-party options listed below.

Third party apps

Although it’s not our favorite option, there are third party apps that make it possible to send items from your Android device to your printer. Some apps -- like PrinterShare and PrintHand Mobile Print -- restrict mobile printing to Bluetooth or local wifi networks. Others -- like Cloud Print Plus -- untether local requirements so you can print from anywhere. However, it’s always better to try apps owned by hardware manufacturers and Google first. These third party apps should be considered a last resort when other options aren’t available.

Aside from printing wirelessly, Android devices can do just about anything a desktop computer can. If you’re looking for more tips and in-depth guidance on how Android can improve productivity at your business, get in touch with one of our Android experts today. We’re here to help you achieve your mobile technology business goals.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Android
June 28th, 2016

2016June28_AndroidTablet_BWhat’s ice cream without syrup? What’s cocoa without marshmallows? What’s a computer without an Android phone and Google Chrome working hand in hand? The last analogy might sound less decadent and be a little harder to picture than the rest. That’s exactly why you should allow these five following benefits that every Android phone and Chrome combo brings to your computer to fill in the blanks:

Before getting started, you must make sure that Google Now is activated on your Android phone and the same account must be logged in for both the phone and for Chrome.

Send directions from Google Maps to your Android phone

You’re taking your time looking up directions for a restaurant on Google Maps, but your friends called to tell you everyone’s already there; fear not. You can send the location details directly to your phone. Start by typing in the destination on Google Maps and look for the Send to your phone option in the center left, click on that and click on your phone’s name. Et Voila! Co-ordinates should appear in your phone’s notifications.

Sync your computer’s Chrome tabs to your phone

This is especially useful when you are working on or researching something on your computer and need to continue on your phone after work or when heading outside. Tap on the Settings icon (3 vertically aligned dots) on the top of right of the Chrome App in your Android phone, go to Recent tabs, and you’ll see all the devices when you’re logged into Chrome.

Finding your phone

Simply typing “find my phone” in the Google search bar prompts Google to look for the last known location of your phone. On top of that, you can also ring your device in the hopes that someone will pick it up and tell you where you can come pick it up.

Use your phone to control your computer

Start off by installing the Chrome Remote Desktop app from the Google Play Store on your Android phone and the Chrome Remote Desktop app for Chrome on your computer. With this you can see and work on your Mac via Android phones as if you were sitting right in front of your desktop. This also works for Windows computers as well!

Set reminders for yourself with Google Search

If calendar entries aren’t doing the trick, this alternative is perfect for you. After activating Google Now, type in “remind me X to Y” in the Google search bar then click the blue “Remind on Google Now” nestled at the bottom of the reminders box. Google Now will then remind you of whatever you need reminding at that time - you can also set reminders to alert when you reach a certain location as well.

Now that you know that Android has more than just cute names for operating system updates, you should look into investing on a new device for yourself. Especially when there are so many things it’s capable of doing when paired with Google Chrome, expand your tech horizon and make the most of both Apple and Android. For any questions regarding the Android/Chrome combo, feel free to give us a call anytime!

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Android
June 6th, 2016

2016June6_AndroidPhone_BThe I/O conference is a chance to learn about everything new and exciting that Google is working on, and some of the new Android features are that, and more. Traditionally, operating system updates can range from barely visible interface tweaks to unavoidable features, and these are no different. Read on to see if any of the announcements are items you can’t wait to use.

Split Screen

The most visible and exciting feature is Android’s new ‘split-screen’ functionality. Soon you will be able to enter your ‘overview’ mode (the button that shows all of your open apps in a rolodex style queue), click and hold on an app like YouTube and drag it to the top of your screen where it will dock. The bottom half of your screen will remain in ‘overview’ mode, allowing you to select an app to occupy the bottom half of the screen. With this update, sending an email while YouTube is open won’t cause any interruption in either of the two programs. It’s the same as having two monitors, just on a much smaller scale.

Because phone manufacturers get to layer their own components on top of Google’s core Android operating system, Samsung and LG already have a few ‘split-screen’ devices. However, by integrating this item into every Android phone regardless of manufacturer, app developers will have more incentive to optimize their product for this feature or even develop new apps designed entirely around this functionality.

Fast App Switching

Do you ever find yourself switching back and forth between two apps? Maybe you need to write an email on your phone, while using a web page as reference material. Switching between the two can really slow down the flow of your work, and Google has finally addressed this by improving the ‘overview’ interface. In addition to limiting the number of displayed programs and adding a ‘clear all’ button, Android mobile devices will get ‘fast app switching’. With this feature a simple double tap of your ‘overview’ button will switch to the last program you used. After switching to the previous app, you can double tap again to return to the original app. It’s simple, but goes a long way.

Updated Notification Window

Next up is a small change to the native notification window. At the moment, if one app has multiple notifications they all get grouped into one vague ‘card’ in your notification window. I/O announced that in the future users will be able to tap on one of those cards to expand it for more detail. Instead of just seeing that you have six emails from various users, you’ll be able to see more information and access response actions for each individual notification within apps.

Instant Apps

How many times have you installed an app that you didn’t want, but needed for a one-time use? Whether it’s to purchase tickets, gain access to a promotion or receive something from a friend who uses the app, it can be a lengthy and tedious process. With ‘Instant Apps’ Android will give you the option to temporarily load software, similar to a webpage, so you can access the service without actually downloading the unnecessary app. Google promises this will take mere seconds compared to the time it currently takes to download and install full programs before using them.

Some tech writers have cited ‘Instant Apps’ as actually faster than loading a website, with all of the security and safety of an app. Additionally, while the 3 features before this one will be released for phones with the most recent OS update, Google is making ‘Instant Apps’ available to developers for any phone running anything newer than the Jellybean OS.

In general, Android phones offer a lot more customization and developer-specific options when compared to Apple’s mobile devices. However, that can mean a lot more upkeep as well. If you’re having trouble maintaining your Android device’s peak capacity or need help managing their updates, don’t hesitate to call us.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Android
May 19th, 2016

2016May19_AndroidTablet_BSorry M&M fans, but the codename Android M doesn’t stand for your favorite chocolate after all. Android 6.0, or Android Marshmallow, as it’s officially called, was more than just enhancing user experience with Android Lollipop. Although it looks a bit similar to Lollipop by retaining the Material design theme, the new features that come with it are apparently smarter and well, sweeter. We have rounded up a list of new features that you can expect when your tablet finally updates to Android 6.0.

Now on Tap

Google’s digital personal assistant is being made more efficient in giving you quick answers and in figuring out what you may want to do next. Now On Tap can be activated by pressing on your tab’s home button, which works for both onscreen and the physical button. A short animation or a card will appear that will give you quick information based on the context of what is currently on your screen. For example, you are chatting with a client regarding a new restaurant, Now on Tap can give you directions to the restaurant, its contact information or Yelp review. This deep-linking technology also includes shortcuts to apps on your tablet and is also applicable to voice searches. It’s designed in a way that it appears when you need it and disappears so you can resume what you were previously doing.

Android Pay

With the increasing popularity of mobile payment, Google is trying again after the dismal performance of the Google Wallet. The latter is being changed for peer-to-peer payments only, while Google Pay allows you to pay for both in-store and in-app purchases. Google’s newest mobile payment system lets you purchase goods from 700,000 participating stores by using your tab’s NFC technology. Also, checking out in mobile shopping apps is a walk in the park using Android Pay.


Don’t you just hate it when after a few hours of taking the tablet off the charger, you’re left with just 2% battery life? With the Doze mode in Android 6.0, it promises to make your tablet last even longer. This new power-saving feature even uses a lot less power than the current Standby mode. In Doze mode, your tablet hibernates when you put it down for a lengthy period. That means your tab will not be disturbed by power hogging apps, but will still be receiving incoming messages, phone calls and important alarms.

Redesigned App Drawer

Marshmallow comes with a new design for the app drawer - that part in your tablet where all your installed apps are located. A search bar at the top makes it even easier to find an app. Google also remembers your app-opening frequency or periods and can make suggestions on what apps you might want to use. Instead of scrolling left and right, the app drawer now scrolls up or down which is reminiscent of older Android versions.

Android for Work

This may not be a very appealing addition to many but for those who bring their tablet as a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) device at work, this is definitely sexy. Android Marshmallow improves the way it handles security, notifications, VPNs, access and storage. So much so that one device can be used for both home and work purposes.

Fingerprint API

This update may not be all that apparent, but now your Android tab comes with support for a fingerprint reader. This allows you to unlock your tab and its apps, and also to easily verify payments.

App Permissions

Now you can have greater control over the security and privacy of your tablet by approving permission requests on a need-to-use basis. Previously, these apps required carte blanche permission to look at parts of your tablet you actually didn’t want them to. With Android Marshmallow, WhatsApp may not ask for permission to access your photos until you try to take and send one.

However, keep in mind that some apps may not function optimally if you restrict it to resources that it actually needs. Not sure how to proceed when it comes to app permissions? Having problems in updating your tablet’s software? Or are you finding it difficult to integrate your BYOD device with technology at work? Get in touch with one of our experts to assist with any of your technology issues.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Android
April 29th, 2016

2016Apr29_AndroidPhone_BIt’s the middle of the month and you’re waiting to meet a colleague outside a restaurant. As you wait, you idly browse the web and check emails, and then suddenly you’re hit with the notification you dread most. Your Android phone’s data is almost out. Questions race through your will I make it through the last couple of weeks with limited data? Should I buy more? Should I just suck it up and use the slower connection once it’s gone? Let’s face it, these are all questions you want to avoid. And here’s how you can do just that with some tips to save data on your Android phone.

Data Saver for Chrome

We all know surfing the web sucks up data. But did you know there’s a way to reduce the amount of it used while riding the Internet waves? Google Chrome enables you to do just that by compressing Chrome pages, reducing data use by 30-35%. To activate this feature, press the three dots on your Chrome browser > Settings > Data Saver. Switch it on here, and start saving data now.

Video Compression on Opera

Google Chrome isn’t the only browser with a compressing feature that saves data. The Opera mini browser also compresses data, but with video instead. Of course, if you’re trying to save data it’s a good idea to avoid streaming video while not connected to Wi-Fi, but if you must do so, follow these steps on your Opera mini browser to load videos faster while saving data: go to Settings > Data Savings and tick the video compression box.

Eighty-six Facebook and other data-draining apps

This extremely bloated app has caused multiple problems for Android users. Not only has it been linked to causing Android phone slowdown, but it also consumes a ton of data. A few alternative ways to access Facebook sans the application are to use the web app Tinfoil or via your Google Chrome web browser.

And while we’re on the subject of applications, consider deleting other apps that consume high amounts of data. Of course you likely have dozens of apps on your phone, so how do you know what’s consuming the most? Simply go to Settings > Data usage. From here you can see what apps are consuming the most data and delete them if you so choose.

Restrict background data

If there ever was a nemesis to data usage, it would be background data. This pesky feature of Android consumes data when you’re not browsing the web or using an app. To prevent this from happening, click Settings > Data Usage > Restrict Background Data.

Mind your auto-updates

Just because a new version of an app is available doesn’t mean you should update it right now. Doing so when not connected to Wi-Fi eats up a lot of data, which is why it’s important to turn off auto-updates because when switched on your apps will update automatically regardless of whether you’re connected to a Wi-Fi signal or simply using data. So set your Android to only update in the presence of Wi-Fi by going to Google Play Store > Settings > Auto Update Apps > Auto-update Apps over Wi-Fi Only.

Hold-off on streaming music

We know you love streaming music on YouTube, Spotify, and similar sites but, let’s be honest, this is killing your data. There’s nothing wrong with streaming music from these sites in and of itself, simply wait till you can connect to Wi-Fi to do so. In the meantime, listen to music you have stored on your phone to get your tunes in.

Take your apps offline

Many apps provide an option to access them offline without consuming any data. Google Docs is a prime example. You can choose which documents you’d like to access while not connected to the Internet. Make it a habit to check which of your apps have offline access options and enable that setting whenever possible.

Saving data on your Android device is not rocket science. Most of the time you simply need to be a bit more conscious of your online activities, and you can save a tremendous amount of data in the process. Hopefully these tips will help you do just that. If you’d like to learn how else you can improve your Android devices, get in touch with our experts now.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Android